2012

Florida Compendium of

Programs and Best Practices

in

Arts Integration

Compiled by Dr. Mary Palmer

Sponsored by the Florida Department of Education

and the

Florida Department of State/Division of Cultural Affairs




Introduction

2012 Compendium entries are presented in two categories:  Programs and Best Practices.  The Programs category provides information about  ongoing as well as short-term arts integration offerings around Florida.  Best Practices provides more specific program information and may include web links to additional information, lesson plans, related powerpoints, and other support materials.

Each category of the Compendium is divided into five sections in order to provide easy access to specific types of programs.   We hope that you’ll take time to review Programs and Best Practices in all sections in order to find ideas and inspiration for your own work.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

         Section 1:  Whole School Change through the Arts 
         Section 2:  Community Arts and Arts Organizations Programs
         Section 3:  General Curriculum Programs
         Section 4:  Arts Curriculum Programs
         Section 5:  Higher Education Programs



Section 1:

 Whole School Change Through the ARTS

Best Practices

FAAE School Improvement Through Arts Integration: Mary Palmer

Arts with Heart Art Festival: Shana Rafalski


FAAE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT THROUGH ARTS INTEGRATION PROGRAM

Purpose:

Arts Integration is sweeping the country and is touted as a strong contributor to student success, to improving the “school climate,” and to enlivening teachers and communities.  While somewhat familiar, this approach to teaching and learning requires new ways of thinking and doing by educators, administrators and students.  In small, rural, or underserved schools, access to professional development experiences often is limited.  This program was designed to explore high quality professional development in arts integration in ways that make support available to practitioners who otherwise wouldn’t be served.  Professional development is offered in a blended format including “in-person” sessions as well as electronic and online opportunities.

Who is involved?

Participating schools Plew Elementary School (Okaloosa County) and Ivy Hawn Charter School (Volusia County) were selected from among statewide applicants.  Following an introductory in-service program focused on Arts Integration, teachers self-selected, with principal approval, for participation.  Professional development experiences were designed and delivered by Mary Palmer & Associates, LLC.  

Program Frequency:

Professional development support is available to the participating schools for a two year period.  Two in-school “live” sessions and ten webinar sessions were supplemented by ongoing electronic communication among teachers and professional development providers. Data collection will “follow” the progress of participating students and teachers during the time frame of this program.        

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

300 students are directly impacted by this program.


Why is the program important?

This program seeks to provide high quality professional development supported by the use of 21st century technologies at an affordable cost to participants.  The program seeks to empower teachers to implement arts integrated teaching strategies in a supportive environment and to build school-based Professional Learning Communities to sustain that work.  In addition, results of the impact of the program will be tracked over a two year period.

How is the program funded?

The program is funded through grants from the Florida Department of Education and the Florida Department of State/Division of Cultural Affairs.

 

Name: Dr. Mary Palmer
Position
: FAAE Program Director
School/Organization: Mary Palmer & Associates, LLC in collaboration with the Florida Alliance for Arts Education
County: Orange
Email: MPalmerAssoc@aol.com
Phone:
407-382-1661

ARTS WITH HEART ARTS FESTIVAL

 Purpose:

The Arts with Heart Arts Festival brings students and the community opportunities to understand, explore, participate in and enjoy a vast array of arts-related products and performances.  Students are exposed to visual, musical, dramatic and kinesthetic arts across the content areas during the weeks of state testing, culminating with a two day and one evening. Check here to see a slideshow

Who is Involved?

All students Pre-K-Grade 5, classroom and arts teachers, visiting artists, families and the community are involved in the festival.

Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

1200

Why is the program important?

The program is important because it keeps an academic focus for students each day after testing in a fun and creative way.  It also provides our students with an abundance of arts experiences which span the content areas through cross integration.

How is the program funded?

Most of the funding comes from community volunteerism and donations.  Some funding comes from supply budgets and Family Involvement allocations.

Name: Shana Rafalski
School/Organization:  TAESIS/Osceola County Schools     
Position: Principal
County: Osceola
Email: rafalsks@osceola.k12.fl.us
Phone: 407-935-3540

Return to top of page




Section 2:

        Community Arts and Arts Organizations Programs

Best Practices

Arts on the Grow: Pam Coffman

Drum Magic: Jana Broder

"Fish Tales" - Integration Through Collaboration: Delma Iles

They are "Apped" to Learn: Nelson Deborah

Mural, Clay, and Waterfall Project: :Brenda Smoak

History in Motion: Margo Blake

Gulf Alliance for Local Arts After School: Dolores Lowery

Imprints: Mary Palmer

Programs

               Dancing the Five Paragraph Essay: Kathryn Austin

               Arts Alive in Every Classroom: Joyce Bonomini

               Drum it Up or Drum it Down: Heather Derigo

               Arts Literacy in the Classroom: Shelly Dorfman

               Arts for Learning Lessons: Janet Evans

               Creating Environment Through Drama: Diane Messina

               Inclusion in the Arts: Jennifer Bonaventura,Kristin Langeloh,Heather,Spooner 

               Creative Clay Transition: Kim Dohrman

               Cathedral Arts Project: Jeff Smith



Section 2:

        Community Arts and Arts Organizations Programs

Best Practices

ARTS ON THE GROW

 

Purpose:

Arts on the Grow is an arts integration program designed to promote the growth of the whole child by connecting artistic and creative development with a wide range of skills in other areas, including perceptual, cognitive, language, and social skills.  This program, developed by the Museum of Florida Art in collaboration with Mid-Florida Community Services Head Start, aligns with The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework and Florida School Readiness Performance Standards.

Who is Involved?

The Museum of Florida Art and Mid-Florida Community Services Head Start centers in DeLand, DeLeon Springs, and Orange City, Florida are actively involved in our program.  The Museum of Florida Art collaborated with a curriculum writing team from Mid-Florida Community Services Head Start which was composed of teachers, Child Development Specialists and administrators to develop an arts integrated curriculum based on selected images from the Museum’s permanent collection.

The Museum provided: grant writing, art prints, resources, materials, artists classroom visits, field studies/tours for students and parents, teacher training, evaluation and an exhibition of Head Start student art.  Head Start provided: a curriculum writing team, teacher training, resources, classroom instruction, supervision, and coordination between the Museum and individual Head Start Centers.

The Museum Arts Education Curator, Pam Coffman, serves as the project coordinator and Amy Thomas serves as the Head Start site coordinator.

Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

Phase 1, January, 2012 – June, 2012: 200 students 

Why is the program important?

Arts on the Grow provides an early childhood and school readiness arts integrated program that allows children to: access multiple intelligences, develop higher thinking skills, enhance multicultural understandings, build self-esteem, gain positive emotional responses to learning, practice the arts, and engage through a variety of learning styles. It also provides opportunities to involve families and connect children to the artists, art venues, and culture in their community.

How is the program funded?

This program was funded by a grant from the PNC Foundation Grow Up Great program.

Name: Pam Coffman
School/Organization:  Museum of Florida Art  
Position: Curator of Education
County: Volusia
Email: coffman@MuseumofFloridaArt.org
Phone: 386-734-4371




DRUM MAGIC

Purpose:

The purpose of Drum Magic is to build community by modeling the facets of a drum circle. Learning communication skills, managing anger, overcoming shyness and building self esteem are the main purposes for the program.

Who is involved?

Everyone is involved! Drum Magic touches the lives of children, their teachers, their families, and their peers. The role of the administrator is to provide the space for the magic to occur and to join in the fun.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

6000

Why is the program important?

This program builds communities through drumming. Music is a universal language and requires no words to be spoken. When Drum Magic comes to your school, every child drums.

How is the program funded?

The program is funded through individual Arts Councils throughout the state as well as PTA's, individual grants, and sponsors.

Name: Jana Broder
School/Organization: Drum Magic, LLC
Position: Owner
County: Hillsborough
Email: janabroder@drummagic.net
Phone: 813-361-4667



"FISH TALES" - INTEGRATION THROUGH COLLABORATION

Purpose:

"Fish Tales" is a 40-minute interactive dance performance with original score and vibrant costumes that uses dance as a tool for teaching environmental science and biology. It is aimed at students in grades 3-5 and tells the story of South Florida's fragile ecosystem formed by coral reefs and mangroves and the creatures that live there. It encourages respect for this ecosystem and conservation of it.  All students are drawn into the performance as dancers and singers.  "Fish Tales" empowers kids to act positively to protect the natural environment while providing them with scientifically accurate information about the reef and mangrove ecosystem.

Please click here for further information on this program: www.fishtalesmomentum.com

Who is Involved?

The artists of Momentum Dance Company perform "Fish Tales" in schools, libraries, community centers, museums, and other appropriate settings.

Creative Team:

Choreographer & Project Director - Delma Iles, Artistic Director Momentum Dance Company, Dance Faculty Miami Dade College, award-winning choreographer, MFA in Dance New York University

Composer - Dr. Devin Marsh - Music Faculty University of Miami, former elementary school music teacher, band leader of Chill Lodge, award-winning composer

Script - Laura Cerwinske, noted South Florida-based writer and author of seven books on architecture and interior design

Costume Designer - Marilyn Skow, Chair of the Department of Theater at Florida International University, costume designer for Momentum for 25 years as well as costume designer for Dance Now, FIU Theater Department and several Miami-based professional theater companies

Project Development and Lead Researcher, Assistant Choreographer - Barbie Freeman, MS in Biology FIU, Biologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, principal dancer with Momentum since 1999.

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

Varies from year to year.

Why is the program important?

"Fish Tales" was created through a unique collaboration among Iles, biologist/dancer Freeman, composer Devin Marsh, librettist Laura Cerwinske, and costumer Marilyn Skow to integrate dance with authentic scientific information about South Florida's unique ecosystem formed by coral reefs and mangroves. Scientific research was conducted by Dr. Walter Goldberg of the FIU Biology Department, who also identified the most important concepts and creatures that a child in the target age group should know.

After the "Fish Tales" experience, students know the habits and threats to the environments of the manatee, stingray, candy stripe shrimp, jellyfish, parrotfish, and gulper eel.  The choreography draws from the actual movement patterns of each creature, and costumes are derived from research on color, texture, shape and size. The music is in a jazzy Caribbean style that uses rhythms that echo the characteristic movement of each creature (gliding for the stingray, lively for the shrimp, majestic for the manatee, etc.). Every element of the presentation reinforces the scientific aspects while remaining fun, lively and very entertaining. Dance skills are developed in an on-site movement workshop with the dancers.  A Study Guide prepares students for this “live” performance experience. 

How is the program funded?

Funding to create "Fish Tales" came from the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, and Funding Arts Network. Subsidy for booking "Fish Tales" is available from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs' Florida Touring Program.

Name: Delma Iles
School/Organization: Momentum Dance Company/Miami Dade College
Position: Artistic Director/Dance Program Coordinator
County: Miami-Dade
Email: mdanceco@bellsouth.net
Phone: 305-858-7002


THEY ARE "APPED" TO LEARN


Purpose:

This program provides techniques to allow K-12 students with severe cognitive disabilities access to music curriculum. 

Royal Palm School is a center school for students with severe cognitive disabilities. Through the use of high technology, I integrate sensory information, communication, and more in my lessons. I have developed a way to utilize the iPad through MyTalk, a communication application, to provide an effective means of communication. I use Soundbeam for tactile defensive students as a way to create music without touching anything. I have also developed a multiple switch computer based program so students can tell a story with music and sound effects. My school has a sensory classroom with an interactive light floor and a vibroacoustic floor tied to a whiteboard that integrates curriculum experiences.

Who is Involved?

The students and staff at Royal Palm School are all an integral part of this program.

Program Frequency:
Ongoing

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?
150

Why is this program important?
Reaching students with severe cognitive disabilities is challenging because their needs are very diverse. Individual students lead me into action research to discover “what works” in a given situation.   The program offers a perfect synergy with world class equipment and the drive to learn new techniques to meet individual student needs. This program addresses Individual Education Program (IEP) goals, social/behavioral skills, and academic curriculum through music curriculum instruction.

How is the program funded?
This is a public school that receives no extra funding for this program.

Name: Deborah Nelson
School/Organization: Royal Palm School
Position: Music Teacher
County: Palm Beach
Email: deborah.nelson@palmbeachschools.org
Phone: 561-357-1949

MURAL, CLAY & WATERFALL PROJECT: USING MATH, SCIENCE & LITERARY SKILLS TO CREATE ART

Purpose:

This is a mural, clay, and waterfall outdoor installation project that covers all the bases: integrating various content areas into the arts, fostering self-esteem, re- instilling pride in one's school, teaching collaboration, team-building, and community building. It incorporates math, science, literary skills, and retention programs all in one! This concept was developed and implemented this past spring with great success. Ninety special-needs middle school students were very involved in each aspect of the project, from the initial planning stages through continuing to take care of the native plants in the garden they planted. Students with all types of challenges, including learning disabilities, behavioral issues, self-esteem issues, thrived and loved every minute of it. A short video can be seen at: www.artandalchemy2.com

Who is Involved?

Five teachers, the PTA, principal, and vice principal were involved.

Over 100 people from across the country sent in money to support the project. To support the local economy, local artisans and businesses were hired to participate. By the time we finished the project, local newspapers, magazines, and the public were involved as well.

Program Frequency:
Ongoing

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?
300

Why is this program important?

Through creating art, students learned math concepts, science concepts, and social skills, while collaborating on a huge project together, something that had not been done often at this school. Some students had cutting issues which are now gone, others wanted to drop out and are still there. The impact of involving these ninety students who were previously shunned and ignored by the larger student body has been profound not only on the students, but also on the staff, parents, and administration of the school. The project has won several awards and the businesses who participated agree that this should be done in all types of venues.

How is the program funded?
It has been funded through a grant from the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, personal contributions, corporate contributions, and social media donations.

Name: Brenda Smoak
School/Organization: Freelance Teaching Artist
Position: National VSA Teaching Artist Fellow
County: Sarasota
Email: brenda@artandalchemy2.com
Phone: 941-201-7282


HISTORY IN MOTION


Purpose:

The purpose of this program is to support student achievement through artist/teacher collaborations that integrate the art of dance with academic curricula.  The program promotes cultural diversity by introducing students to African culture through dancing and drumming.  In this program, students discover and use their inherent creative abilities to tell a story and to promote teamwork.

Who is involved?

Teachers, students, and administrators all have roles in this program.  The teacher’s role is to collaborate with the Teaching Artist, and students, to participate as learners and choreographers.  Principals’ and administrators’ roles are to provide ongoing support and opportunities to share the experiences and outcomes with the entire school community. 

Program Frequency:

One time

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

350

Why is the program important? 

This program is important because it gives students the opportunity to reach beyond their own culture and explore another through African music and dance.  By introducing dance into the classroom, both teachers and students are challenged to bring the curriculum to life, tying historical facts together to compose a story to be told through choreography and performance.

How is the program funded?

Funds are provided by the hosting organization.

Name:  Margo Blake
School/Organization: The Center for Contemporary Dance
Position: Teaching Artist
County: Orange
Email: revblaketyler@aol.com
Phone:
407-291-7384

GULF ALLIANCE FOR LOCAL ARTS AFTERSCHOOL / SUMMER ARTS PROGRAM

Purpose:

The purpose of this program is to provide 2-D and 3-D visual arts lessons to Gulf County K-12 students in a professional art studio setting.  For an example of a lesson plan where children created sea creatures, click here .

Who is involved?

Community leaders, parents, and teaching artists working together have created a visual arts program for children.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?  

140

Why is the program important?

This program gives children of all income levels access at little or no cost to professional art instruction, tools, and materials.  Classes focus on acrylic painting, mixed media and collage, and hand built clay.

How is the program funded?

The program is grant funded

Name: Dolores Lowery
School/Organization: Gulf Alliance for Local Arts
Position: Teaching artist
County: Gulf
Email: seagrassart@gmail.com
Phone: 850-814-2826


IMPRINTS: ARTS INTEGRATION THROUGH PRINTMAKING


Purpose:

IMPRINTS is a multifaceted offering of arts integrated experiences to enhance participants' understanding of the art of Printmaking.  Through hands-on experiences with printmaking techniques shown in the Mennello Museum of American Art (Orlando) exhibition IMPRINTS: 20 Years of UCF Flying Horse Editions, people of all ages have grown in their appreciation of the ancient art of printmaking while having a great time creating their own artworks!

Who is involved?

Program collaborators include the Mennello Museum of American Art, the University of Central Florida Flying Horse Editions (fine art press), the UCF Print Collective, and Mary Palmer & Associates.  All program experiences are directly linked to the prints currently on exhibit.  A comprehensive arts integrated curriculum guide is available online (see http://www.marypalmer.org/flyinghorse.shtml.)  At the Museum, master printers present live lectures as well as online demonstrations.  UCF Art and Art Education students, experienced printmakers themselves, present printmaking workshops for families, children only, and adults only.  In addition, "sample" printmaking experiences have been offered at local festivals and other off-site events.

Program Frequency:

One time       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

10,000  This high level of student participation is especially due to outreach efforts, including presentations at community festivals which engaged a broad audience in the content of the educational offerings related to this exhibition.

Why is the program important? 

IMPRINTS connects high quality artistic resources of the University of Central Florida with those of the Mennello Museum of American Art.  Through the development of a strong education component in collaboration with Mary Palmer & Associates, the mysteries of printmaking have been made accessible to literally thousands of people.

How is the program funded?

The program is funded through a grant from the Orange County Arts and Cultural Affairs Department and the Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art.  Workshops and camps carry a participation fee.  Many programs e.g. Family Days and local festivals, are offered free to the public.


Name: Dr. Mary Palmer and Genevieve Bernard
School/Organization: Mary Palmer & Associates, LLC; Genevieve:  Mennello Museum of American Art
Position: Mary:  President; Genevieve:  Curator of Education
County: Orange
Email: MPalmerAssoc@aol.com; genevieve.bernard@cityoforlando.net
Phone:
407-382-1661


Section 2: 

Community Arts and Arts Organizations 

Programs


DANCING THE FIVE PARAGRAPH ESSAY

Purpose:

The purpose of this program is to build bridges across alternative learning styles in order to arrive at a common voice for writing which reciprocally enhances reading comprehension. In this residency, techniques for creating movement compositions will be implemented in ways that help to bridge the writing challenge of moving prompt to paper.  Specifically, students will engage in strategies for channeling thought into action; action into words. Dance educator, Kathryn White Austin uses curiosity, compassion, and creativity to help young students find the moving words for their writing voices.

Movement exploration provides an alternative means of communicating which can be used to bridge the challenge associated with writing into a more confident and creative “voice” by connecting action to words! Writing and dance are infused to help students affirm their own creative value and practice the discipline of putting thought into action: movement = writing, and can be integrated even by non-dance teachers.

Who is Involved?

Kathryn Austin, teaching artist, is the owner/director of The Centre for Dance & the Performing Arts, a dance education program offering classes in pre-professional and recreational dance genres with an emphasis on whole-child development, brain-based modalities, and arts-infused learning strategies. Our dance curricula are aligned with National Standards and age-appropriate achievement benchmarks. At CDPA, our teachers use dance as a primary medium for engaging all students at their particular level and within their personal learning style in order to make dance integral in their personal approach to life, learning, and living fully as expressive, confident, and engaged citizens.  

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

60 – 80 students

Why is this program important?

Writing is a challenge for many students.  Yet developing the ability to express thoughts effectively is critical to success in school and in life. Writing has permanence that dance/movement does not; this permanence may be intimidating to youth who are only beginning to formulate personal thought and opinion. Movement/dance can provide an alternative means of communicating which can segue to writing with a more confident and creative voice.  Connecting movement to words provides a successful bridge to writing for many struggling writers.  Excellence in academics is supported through the infusion of academic concepts and skills in literature, science, math, and social issues into dance. 

How is the program funded?

School-based resources, parent organizations, and cooperative grants are sources of funding.

Name: Kathryn Austin
School/Organization: Centre for Dance & the Performing Arts
Position: Owner/Director
County: Orange
Email: kwadance@gmail.com
Phone: 321-960-5916


ARTS ALIVE IN EVERY CLASSROOM

Purpose:
PASSport is an arts infusion partnership program between Ruth Eckerd Hall’s (REH) Marcia P. Hoffman Performing Arts Institute (MPH) and four Title 1 Pinellas County Elementary Schools (Skycrest, Lealman Ave, Eisenhower, and Skyview). It is a school-based, embedded professional development model founded on the premise that all children benefit from a learning environment that includes affective instruction that embodies the creative process and the nurturing of the imagination. The partnership's goal is to develop empowered instructors and learners who have a greater sense of confidence, creativity and self-esteem, giving them the power and authority to become lifelong learners.

Why is this program important?

PASSport is not a delivery product but a partnership program. The cultural institution provides a foundation and structure that allows each individual school to evolve and develop its own arts integration voice and curriculum focus. PASSport is phased into a school, becoming part of the academic environment, changing the culture of the school and community, and creating stability and sustainability. It is a reciprocal, embedded professional development program, with classroom teachers, teaching artists and administrators working on an ongoing basis, learning from one another’s expertise.  PASSport has existed for 12 years in area schools and has developed a reputation of excellence.

Name: Joyce Bonomini
School/Organization: Hoffman Institute at Ruth Eckerd Hall
Position: Director of Education
County: Pinellas
Email: jbonomini2@rutheckerdhall.net
Phone: (727) 712-2732


DRUM IT UP OR DRUM IT DOWN - DRUMMING FOR FUN & POSITIVE TRANSFORMATION

Purpose:

The purpose of 'drum it up' programs is to uplift, inspire, empower, and create through group drumming!  In ‘drum it down,’ the purpose is to relax, instill calm, and promote health and well-being through guided repetitive rhythms and inspired thought expression. Whether drumming up or down, the design is to empower, express, and transform through the art of drumming.

Who is involved?

Any one of any race, religion, culture, geographical location, or age from 1-100; my oldest drummer is 103!

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

5,000 - 10,000

Why is the program important?

These interactive programs offer participants the rare opportunity to come together and experience the magic of group synergy and creation.  No skills are required. Through drumming in a non-threatening and highly fun environment, I help participants unlock their own rhythms by letting go of the 'thinking process’ and trusting themselves to create individually and as a unit.  This unique form of interactive performing arts has the power to change lives one drum at a time.

How is the program funded?

Schools, churches, youth detention centers, organizations, businesses, special needs groups, assisted living facilities for seniors, and private groups pay an appropriate fee ahead of time to book a program. Sometimes the participants pay directly.

Name: Heather Derigo
School/Organization: YOUniversal Rhythms
Position: Art Teacher
County: Hillsborough
Email: info@youniversalrhythms.com
Phone: 813-770-8313


ARTS LITERACY IN THE CLASSROOM

Purpose:

Collaboration, guided inquiry, documentation, and reflection are featured benefits to the collaborative review, retelling, illustration, and acting out of children’s books in the classroom. Both academic and artistic teaching and learning strategies enhance the literacy skills of synthesizing, sequencing, and questioning.

Who is Involved?

Partners 4 Learning is a comprehensive arts education program that provides interdisciplinary teaching and learning in and through the arts and culture for teachers, artists and students. Experiential professional development workshops for teachers and artists are provided for in-school and after-school programs. Works of art in dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts are the text for learning. Collaboration among teachers is encouraged.

Program Frequency:

Four times a year – varying residencies

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

1,000 students

Why is this program important?

Unique features of the Partners 4 Learning program include: an in-depth study of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts as a text for teaching and learning with guided inquiry and reflection; professional development workshops for teachers and artists which include art making, questioning, reflection, and contextual research; comprehensive practice including collaboration and interdisciplinary teaching and learning across the curriculum aligned with core curriculum and state benchmarks.

How is the program funded?

Matching funds between foundations and schools

Name: Shelly Dorfman
School/Organization: PARTNERS 4 Learning
Position: Director
County: Sarasota
Email: artsined@gmail.com
Phone: 941-554-4056


ARTS FOR LEARNING LESSONS: GRAPHIC STORY ADVENTURES

Purpose:
The Young Audiences, Inc. Arts for Learning Lessons (A4L Lessons) provide an arts-integrated framework for teachers to use in the classroom and includes a corresponding artist residency designed to support and extend the classroom component. The A4L Lessons arts-infused framework promotes 21st century skills that support state and local literacy standards and encourage students to become critical thinkers, creative problem solvers, and lifelong learners.

Why is this program important?

Young Audiences, Inc. is the only arts-in-education organization to receive the Presidential Medal of Honor for the depth and quality of its programming across the country. Its A4L Lessons program has shown significant results including: 2x gains in comprehension; 4x gains in understanding author's choice; 6x gains in visualization of text; 5x gains in understanding story elements. A4L Lessons’ students showed significantly greater literacy learning compared with a control group.

Name: Janet Evans
School/Organization: Arts for Learning/Miami
Position: Program Director
County: Miami-Dade
Email: janet@A4Lmiami.org
Phone: 305-576-1212 ext 30

 

CREATING ENVIRONMENT THROUGH DRAMA

Purpose:

Students read and learn about many different environments, such as the rainforest, the arctic tundra, Native American tribes, or a village in the 1600s. But what if the students could bring that environment to life in their very own classroom? In Creating Environment through Drama, students work together to create an environment based off of the Apalachee, Choctaw, and Timucua tribes. Students identify closely with the given environment and accompanying curriculum, enabling them to experience the setting more thoroughly.

Students experience a creative drama warm up, pantomime tribe daily activities, create tableaux of the living environment, and bring their village to life. These activities scaffold to encourage freedom and ownership via study of the environment.

Why is this program important?

This program demonstrates creative drama integration in to social studies curriculum. Participants will learn how to bring to life any environment they are teaching their students. Creative drama integration can make a lasting impression on any student and help that student retain what they have learned.

Name: Diane Messina
School/Organization: Orlando Repertory Theatre
Position: Community Engagement Coordinator
County: Orange
Email: dianem@orlandorep.com
Phone: 407-896-7365 ex. 202


INCLUSION IN THE ARTS 

Purpose:

The mission of VSA Florida states that every young person with and without a disability deserves access to appropriate arts learning experiences. We embrace a culture in which people with disabilities can learn through, participate in, and enjoy the arts. We offer Cultural Access trainings, Artist in Residency programs in drama, movement, music, visual art and writing, as well as community art classes. 

By offering arts experiences to a diverse audience of varying abilities, VSA Florida integrates arts experiences with concepts in all areas of the school curriculum. These integration programs teach both the student artists and those who work with them concepts in diversity, inclusion, empathy, courage, and compassion. Additionally, by allowing all students to more fully participate in their instruction, students are able to learn and retain more.

VSA provides artist residencies in ESE and inclusion classrooms as well as in juvenile justice facilities.  All students are included in learning; adaptations and accommodations are made to ensure that all students can participate.  Residency lessons incorporate the Sunshine State Standards for learning and correlate to the classroom curriculum. Weekly 'My Art My Way' classes are among the newest programs being offered throughout the state. VSA offers calls to artists, exhibits, other programs and training for those who work with students with disabilities. www.vsafl.org

Why is this program important?

VSA Florida advocates the arts as a way of communication, a means to unite people of all abilities, and a pathway to opportunities. We realize that the arts are a profound tool for learning. This program helps all arts educators develop inclusive teaching strategies.

This program is unique in that through multimodal learning students of varying abilities can participate in and benefit from the same curricula at the same time.  Both the instructors and the students learn ways to accommodate and learn from each other's differences.

How is this program funded?

VSA Florida provides partial support for artist residencies.

Name: Jennifer Bonaventura, Kristin Langeloh, Heather Spooner
School/Organization: VSA Florida
Position: Regional Program Coordinators
County: Jennifer: Bay; Kristin: Collier; Heather: Hillsborough
Email: Jennifer: jennifer@bonavstudio.com, Kristin: kllangeloh@hotmail.com,  Heather: heatherspooner@hotmail.com
Phone: Jennifer: 850-319-1209, Kristin: 239-272-5323, Heather: 813-789-9097


CREATIVE CLAY TRANSITION



Purpose:

The purpose of this program, founded in 2008, is to provide expressive, educational, and vocational experiences in the arts for ESE transition students ages 18-22. This multi-disciplinary program includes classes in graphic design, painting, ceramics, fiber art, mixed media, writing, theater, and dance. Student artists work with professional art instructors to develop the skills to become professional artists. Besides work on skill-building and technique, students learn how to market their work, speak professionally about their work and process, and how to price and sell the artwork. In addition, student artists have the opportunity to submit their designs for consideration for the Creative Clay retail shop.  Students not only produce artwork to be sold but also have the experience of running the Creative Clay Artworks retail store.

Who is Involved?

Professional guest artist instructors teach classes. The Pinellas County School system contracts Creative Clay to provide the classes and training for ESE transitional students. The Creative Clay Executive Director, Pinellas County School Principal, and lead ESE Instructor and Associate oversee this program.

Frequency:

Ongoing

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

20

Why is this program important?

This program is important because it gives creative students with disabilities the opportunity to learn what it takes to become a professional artist while also gaining the skills needed to operate a retail shop.

Name: Kim Dohrman
School/Organization: Creative Clay Cultural Arts Center
Position: Executive Director
County: Pinellas
Email: kim@creativeclay.org
Phone: 727-421-3125

 

CATHEDRAL ARTS PROJECT

Purpose:

The Cathedral Arts Project (CAP) provides twice-weekly after-school and summer instruction in dance (ballet, ballroom, folk, jazz, modern, and West African), drama (acting and playwriting), music (band, chorus, percussion, strings, and world drumming), and visual arts (drawing, painting, mixed media, and pottery). Classes provide arts integrated and multi-disciplinary experiences for all students.  CAP empowers underserved, school-aged children to succeed in all areas of their lives by providing access to instruction in the visual and performing arts.

The mission of the Cathedral Arts Project is to enrich the quality of life in Northeast Florida through unleashing the creative spirit of young people. Our vision is for every child in Northeast Florida to have access to a well-rounded, arts-rich education that endows his or her spirit with the imagination, self-confidence and strength of character that inspires great leadership and a will to succeed.

Who is involved?

We primarily partner with schools and community centers in Duval County where at least 62% of the population qualifies for Free and Reduced Lunch or lives below 85% of the poverty level. Currently, 55% or 67,950 Duval County public school students qualify for Free and Reduced Lunch.

Cathedral Arts serves students at 27 Duval County sites during the academic year and seven sites during the summer months. We employ 58 local teaching artists and assistants to offer after-school and summer programs.

Program staff and guest presenters provide training in arts integration and curriculum development for every teaching artist to ensure that students receive standards-based, multi-disciplinary instruction. The teaching artists and program staff maintain ongoing communication with school and district level administrators to ensure the success of every program.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

1775

Why is the program important?

Field trips to museums and performances as well as visiting artists in the classroom are often used to augment class instruction. Teachers are asked to develop meaningful connections to the arts and other subject areas. Students in one class might learn about photosynthesis by developing a dance routine while students in another class develop knowledge of science and the St. John’s River by writing a play.  Each lesson also focuses on building character skills, such as cooperation, anger management, negotiation and compromise, active listening, assertiveness, and stress management.

Our curriculum includes the history and vocabulary of each art form taught, as well as its application and/or performance. Age-appropriate benchmarks from the Florida Department of Education's Sunshine State Standards are incorporated into all lesson plans.

For many of our students, the creation of an artwork or completion of a music or dance performance is the first time that they have accomplished something positive and beautiful. Seeing their work on exhibit or hearing applause while on stage helps them to realize that they are successful, valuable individuals, and as such have a future beyond their current social and economic situations. They are motivated to set goals, finish school, and become productive adults.

 How is the program funded?

CAP programs are funded through government agencies such as the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville and the City of Jacksonville, Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as corporate and individual support. In addition, special events are held throughout the year to raise awareness and funds.

Name: Jeff Smith
School/Organization: Cathedral Arts Project
Position: Associate Director
County: Duval
Email: jsmith@capkids.org
Phone: 904-281-5599 ext. 21

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Section 3. General Curriculum

Best Practices

Elementary Arts Integration Literacy Centers: Kelly Geurts 

Learning Through Dramatic Lengths: Jeannine Meis

Nocturnal Owls: Toni New

A Science and Arts Integration Approach to Water, Wetlands, and Wildlife: Deborah Seto

Programs

Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Violin Literacy Piloit Program: Debbie Fahmie

Science of Batik Crayon Art: Nancy Abdallah

The Artistic Energy of Motion: Marion Hanks

Green Screen: Scott Kauffman

Bodily Brainstorming: Julia Perlowski 

Bringing Books to Life: Mary Register

Everglades Enchantments: Abena Robinson

The Educational Value of Creating Video Games: Josette Twait

Treasure Maps to the FCAT Writes: Terese Whittaker


Section 3. General Curriculum

Best Practices

ELEMENTARY ARTS INTEGRATION LITERACY CENTERS

Purpose:

The purpose of using arts integration literacy centers is twofold. First, teachers often express concern that they find it hard to find time to implement Arts Integration activities in their classrooms even though they have seen the benefits of such activities. Centers are a key component of the elementary reading workshop.  Including the arts in these centers exposes students to the arts through engaging arts learning experiences that are integrated with general curriculum content.  When planned effectively, such centers reinforce valuable arts and literacy skills, and enable teachers to meet with small groups of students for targeted skill instruction.

Click here for an example PowerPoint.

Click here for examples of Arts Integration Centers for use in the Intermediate Grades.

Who is involved?

As a first grade classroom teacher, my own students are exposed to these centers daily. I created a series of intermediate level centers which target FCAT skills. I presented these centers and made them available to the teachers at the Arts and Environmental Science Elementary School where I teach. I have also given workshops at another elementary school and at a FAAE Regional Consortium.

Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

100+

Why is the program important?

Numerous teachers have shown interest in this approach The 20th century brings with it new challenges for our students. They are bombarded daily with multimedia information which they need to be able to process, interpret, and assess. For this reason, literacy education needs to become multimodal as well. Arts Integration centers provide just such an opportunity for students.

How is the program funded?

While my centers were purchased at my own expense, creating effective centers does not need to be costly. Free online resources and pictures and text obtained at used book sales provide a wide variety of resources at low or no cost.

Name: Kelly Geurts
School/Organization: Muller Magnet Elementary School
Position: First grade teacher
County: Hillsborough
Email: Kelly.geurts@sdhc.k12.fl.us
Phone: 813-390-2410


LEARNING THROUGH DRAMATIC LENGTHS: USING THEATRE TO REINFORCE MATH AND SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS

Purpose:

Math is an integral part of teaching theatre technology; set design and construction rely heavily on calculating distances, maintaining scale, and calculating angles. In addition, social studies invites students to see the relationship between historical events and theater including examples of real-life applications over time. Students learn to apply and are reinforced in basic math skills through incorporating theatre technology projects into their math and social studies classrooms. 

Please click here to see the “Building with Ratio” Lesson Plan.

Why is this program important?

It is a known fact that kinesthetic activities have an enormous positive impact on students' retention of information. By incorporating theatre technology in the classroom, teachers are not only reinforcing basic math skills but using cross-curricular instruction to address social studies standards and increase exposure to the Arts.

Name: Jeannine Meis
School/Organization: Elizabeth Cobb Middle School
Position: Teacher
County: Leon
Email: meisj@leonschools.net
Phone: 850-513-1371

NOCTURNAL OWLS

Purpose:

This lesson introduces second grade students to the world of the various nocturnal owls. Students construct a 3-dimensional clay owl based on their observations of prints and photographs of owls.  These arts experiences provide an embedded opportunity for learning about, discussing, and applying knowledge of the owl's body parts, life, and habitat to students’ creation of individual artworks.  Art concepts such as texture, slipping, scoring, and attaching clay are explored.  This experiential lesson addresses a variety of learning modalities while stimulating interest in the understanding of history, science, and reading.

See the lesson plan here .

Who is Involved?

This collaboration included the art and second grade classroom teachers. 

Program Frequency:

One time

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?
100 students

Why is this program important?
A well designed art lesson that is age-appropriate is a perfect avenue to extend learning and allow students to build their problem solving skills as well as their social skills.

How is the program funded?

Through in-school art program allocations.

Name: Toni New
School/Organization: W.H. Rhodes Elementary
Position: Art Teacher / Elem. Art Coordinator
County: Santa Rosa
Email: newt@mail.santarosa.k12.fl.us
Phone: 850-983-5670 ext.140

A SCIENCE AND ARTS INTEGRATED APPROACH TO WATER, WETLANDS, AND WILDLIFE

Purpose:

Through this program, students learn to identify the aquifer as pivotal in our everyday life as well as its role in the water cycle, and its interconnectedness to all of the area’s waters.  After being exposed to and capturing various Southwest Florida Water Management District flora and flauna on camera, students will create original paintings portraying the aquifer in its natural habitat of Florida’s waters.  After using test kits to determine water quality, taking measurements to determine pH, temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen amounts, the students will determine biodiversity and viability of the indicator species that are used to determine the quality of water.  Click here to see a Powerpoint of this lesson in action.

Who is involved?  

The school principal and the rest of the administration team fully support the integration of scientific study and arts learning.  Each 6th grade student had artwork painted on canvas displayed throughout our campus.  Students, faculty, parents, and community members are able to view each student's artwork.

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

187

Why is the program important?

Students are given the opportunity to express themselves and the nature surrounding them to develop an image that communicated artistic intent. Students organized the structural elements of art to achieve artistic goals for producing personal works of art. In addition, students engaged in STEM National Science Standards with an arts integrated approach.  Students practiced STEM Standard A and designed and conducted investigations, used technology and mathematics in their investigations, formulated scientific explanations using logic and evidence, and communicated and defended scientific argument. Students practiced STEM Standard F and learned about the environmental quality of Florida's waters, that water is a vital natural resource, and how natural and human-induced hazards can affect our waters and endanger personal and community health.  The STEM strategies used were taken up a notch and the arts were integrated to generate a little STEAM to Orange Grove learning.

How is the program funded?

The program was funded by a grant from SWFWMD.

Name: Deborah Seto
School/Organization: Orange Grove Middle School of the Arts
Position: Teacher
County: Hillsborough
Email: deborah.seto@sdhc.k12.fl.us
Phone: 813-276-5717

Section 3: General Curriculum

Programs

VOLUNTARY PRE-KINDERGARTEN VIOLIN LITERACY PILOT PROGRAM IN OSCEOLA COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS











Purpose:

The Florida DOE selected Osceola County to pilot an Early Childhood String Program.  The funding provides twice weekly string instruction to Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) students in groups of no more than 10 students.

The purpose of this project is to determine the effect of focused group instruction in violin on the development of kindergarten readiness skills in students from three Title I VPK  sites:  Boggy Creek Elementary, Poinciana Academy for the Fine Arts, and Chambers Park, an annex of Central Avenue Elementary School.  In year one, a total of seventy-two (72) students received violin instruction taught by a highly qualified strings specialist using a curriculum that has been specifically designed to align with the purpose of this project. The curriculum, directed toward the development of language, pre-reading, and kindergarten readiness skills through violin instruction, focuses on attention span, listening skills, fine motor skills, sound exploration, and social skills.     

Who is involved?

Former Superintendent of Osceola Schools Dr. Michael Grego and Arts Coordinator Debbie Fahmie worked with the DOE to initiate this project for the first year.  Dr. Mary Palmer served as the program evaluator.  String Specialist Judy Evans wrote the curriculum and trained string instructor Jonita Aadland.  Each of the VPK instructors and assistants actively participated in the string instruction alongside their students.  The principals at all three sites had to buy into the program as it involved the reworking of the school schedule for the classes.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

72

Why is the program important?

The schools selected for participation were based upon the VPK classes that had the greatest potential for at-risk learners who were likely to lack kindergarten readiness skills.  It is anticipated that the students provided string instruction through this project will have higher achievement of kindergarten readiness skills than students who are not given string instruction.  Research in this field offers promising results.  Dr. Laurel Trainor, Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University and Director of the McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind, explains his research which was published in the online edition of the journal “Brain” (September 20, 2006).  “This is the first study to show that brain responses in young, musically trained and untrained children change differently over the course of a year.  These changes are likely to be related to the cognitive benefit that is seen with musical training.”  Professor Trainor’s study involved young students who were provided string instruction.  The children who were given the string instruction improved more over the year on general memory skills that are correlated with non-musical abilities such as literacy, verbal memory, visiospatial processing, mathematics and IQ than did the children not taking string instruction.  This study, as well as the work done by Judy Evans in Collier County, suggests that musical training is having a positive effect on how the brain gets wired for general cognitive functioning related to memory and attention.

How is the program funded?

The Florida Department of Education funded the initial phase of this project with a $20,000 grant.  Year two will be funded through support from the Education Foundation of Osceola County as well as the Osceola School Board.

Name: Debbie Fahmie
School/Organization: Osceola School District
Position: Fine & Performing Arts Coordinator
County: Osceola
Email: fahmied@yahoo.com
Phone: 407-870-4904


SCIENCE OF BATIK CRAYON ART

Purpose:

The Science of Batik Crayon Art allows children to learn the process and science involved in crayon batik; this process can be applied to any realistic or abstract subject matter. The story and illustrations from the African tale, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears, as retold by Verna Aardem, are brought to life as students explore materials in a tactile and creative way.  Through batik crayon art and storytelling, students learn progression and sequencing of a process.

Who is Involved?

The Visual Arts Program in Osceola County continues to grow in scope and influence outside the walls of the classroom into the community at large. Through collaborative action, art teachers have become an amazing resource in creative endeavors to integrate the arts into the academic curriculum.  Art teachers partner with classroom teachers to enrich the school’s total learning environment by integrating the arts throughout the curriculum.

Why is this program important?

The Osceola Visual Arts program is unique in its continued effort to do collaborative projects with the school community. Sharing sessions are continually not only for fellow visual arts teachers but also for educators in the regular classroom.  Together we are growing in our abilities to meet the needs of our diverse student body.

Name: Nancy Abdallah
School/Organization: Boggy Creek Elementary
Position: Art Teacher
County: Osceola
Email: abdallan@osceola.k12.fl.us
Phone: 407-344-5070

THE ARTISTIC ENERGY OF MOTION

Purpose:

After visual exposure to the energy of motion (e.g. gravity) and to the Jackson Pollock style of non-objective painting techniques, students discuss the relationship of the energy of motion to this art form.  After discussion, students will create a non-objective painting using energy of motion by propelling a ball dipped in paint by moving flat box lid in several directions; the motion of paint loaded balls creates a non-objective painting.

Who is Involved?

The four arts integration specialists (music, dance, theater and visual arts) research PK-5th grade pacing guides, meet with classroom teachers, and plan arts lessons that infuse arts curriculum, strategies, and activities into the core curriculum. Children participate in a creative arts lesson designed to also teach reading, writing, science, and social studies. The arts specialists go into regular classrooms during their core curriculum and teach the arts/core curriculum lesson.

Why is this program important?

Students are making learning gains because they participate in unique lessons designed by the arts specialists. We find that comprehension and retention of the core curriculum is raised. Not only do the children enjoy the arts lessons, but they do better when they are participating in hands-on activities.

Name: Marion Hanks
School/Organization: R.R. Moton Elementary
Position: Arts Integration Specialist
County: Miami-Dade County
Email: mhanks@dadeschools.net
Phone: 786-512-8440

GREEN SCREEN: COMBINING ARTS, LITERACY, AND TECHNOLOGY

Purpose:

Green screen technology is a fun and easy way to place students in the middle of your curriculum. Watch the classroom walls melt away as students fly around the world or pop up in their favorite story for a skit.

Who is Involved?

Denn John Middle School is in the beginning stages of creating a true arts integration program through the creation of new curricula in which the arts are utilized in every classroom. The new curricula has been in the preliminary phase of arts integration since representative teachers attended the summer FAAE Arts Integration Conference and shared the information with other teachers in the school. The new administration fully supports an arts integrated curriculum and will soon implement one.

Why is this program important?

The Arts program at Denn John Middle School has become an integral part of the school dynamic. The teachers use a variety of art forms to create dynamic learning experiences in their classrooms.  The students are clamoring for more arts!  Drama and Orchestra have been added to the current Performing and Visual Arts programs. The marriage of academics with the arts and vice versa is very visible and strongly felt.

Name: Scott Kauffman
School/Organization: Denn John Middle School
Position: Media Specialist
County: Osceola
Email: kauffmas@osceola.k12.fl.us
Phone: 407-935-3560

BODILY BRAINSTORMING

Purpose:

Through Bodily Brainstorming, students explore major abstract concepts embedded in complex informational and literary texts.  Students become invested in concepts, stories and lives of characters prior to delving into the text through drama.  Following discussion, students re-create scenes in tableaux to show concepts of liberty, loyalty, disconnection, and freedom.  In the deconstruction process, carried out by the spectators, many ideas are generated around each concept. This approach ensures student creation and ownership of ideas as well as generation of concepts that can be used in reading and extension writing assignments.  Bodily Brainstorming is an effective tool for use with complex text and building Common Core skill requirements.

Who is Involved?

Every student is engaged in this activity at once.  Students are put into groups and then told to make concrete shapes such as squares, triangles, and stars using all their bodies.  Then students are told to make objects from the text.  If, for example, we are reading Romeo and Juliet, I might have them make tableaux (human pictures) of daggers, swords, and love letters.  The higher order thinking begins when students are asked to make tableaux out of abstract concepts such as ambition, fortitude, or enslavement.  After the pictures are made, each group shows their picture to the rest of the class.  Spectators are allowed to brainstorm only on what they see in another group’s creation of the concept.  During discussion many ideas are generated around the concept; ideas are recorded on chart paper and displayed for use during the reading of the text. 

Program Frequency:

Ongoing

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

500 students

Why is this program important?

This program is a fun, active way for students to explore abstract concepts.  All students, no matter their level, are engaged in this process from the start.  This program ensures student creation and ownership of ideas as well as generation of concepts that can be used to enhance life-long reading and writing skills.

How is the program funded?

School funding.

Name: Julia Perlowski
School/Organization:  Pompano Beach High School
Position: Director of Theater Programs/English Instructor
County: Broward
Email: Julia.perlowski@browardschools.com
Phone: 561-699-7658

BRINGING BOOKS TO LIFE

Purpose:

Bringing Books to Life helps students to recreate the cover or pages of a book in order to help them visualize a story. Students incorporate music, mime, and murals in order to attain comprehension, fluency, and word recognition. Students create life-sized book covers, props, and costumes; they develop musical and rhythmic enhancements to use while dramatizing events within a story. Through these hands-on activities, reading is reinforced in the areas of comprehension, sequencing, fluency, and vocabulary development. These activities also open pathways to writing!

Who is Involved?

This program is cross-curricular and collaborative. Art specialists and classroom teachers work together with students to bring a picture book or story to a larger than life view.

Why is this program important?

This program is unique because it can be tailored to meet the strengths of individual teachers or collaborative groups. It can be used to produce an elaborate performance or to simply enhance instruction in the classroom. Older students can perform a story for younger students or for a special parent day. The imagination and visualization employed are invaluable aids in literature comprehension. The possibilities are endless and the instructional benefits are limitless.

Name: Mary Register
School/Organization: Apalachee Tapestry Magnet School of the Arts
Position: Music Teacher
County: Leon
Email: registerm1@leonschools.net
Phone: (850) 488-4110


EVERGLADES ENCHANTMENTS:  CREATE A MURAL OF THE EVERGLADES

Purpose

Students research all aspects of the Everglades and are immersed fully in the experience of this natural wetland habitat. They examine the immense variety of flora and fauna in paintings and photographs by locally and nationally known artists while becoming aware of the life sciences and environmental issues surrounding the Everglades. Ideally their research aids them in formulating a theme and message for developing an informational mural. Once the research is done, students create sketches of an Everglades animal or plant.  Sketches are incorporated into a class mural.  

Who is involved?

This project was devised by Abena Robinson, Art Teacher, and was originally presented as one of the exemplary standards-based workshops at the IMPACT II Idea Expo Teacher Conference on Saturday, October 29, 2011. Resource packets with integrated lesson plans, teacher resources, websites, and extended activities, along with a Power Point presentation on the process of creating Everglades Mural Display boards of student works, photos, books, and Everglades Animal Artworks are available for anyone wishing to replicate this project. 

Why is this program important?

This project reinforces art, science, geography, creative writing, and social studies lessons while fostering high self esteem and engaging students in cooperative learning. Students have a great sense of accomplishment at the culminating event when the mural is unveiled.

How is this program funded?

Original funding was through P.L. Dodge Foundation and Education Fund Mini-Grant awarded to Abena Robinson, Art Teacher.

Name: Abena Robinson
School/Organization: Biscayne Gardens Elementary School
Position: Art Teacher/ Special Area Chairperson
County: Miami-Dade
Email: arobinson@dadeschools.net
Phone: 786-285-7454

THE EDUCATIONAL VALUE OF CREATING VIDEO GAMES

Purpose:

Students created a video game using the software program Gamemaker Pro. The video game is rated 'E' for everyone with an educational value for second through fourth grade students. Students presented their video game at the Technology Student Association competition in Orlando. The competition is designed for the STEM program; however, graphic art students are programming and designing the game. Music Theory students are creating the background gaming music.

Why is this program important?

This unique experience involves three educational areas: Graphic Arts, Music Theory, and STEM. Students have the opportunity to use digital photography, scanners, and drawing tablets to create the visual backgrounds and characters, providing invaluable computer skills. This program also gives educational value to video games, which are rarely seen as having solid educational purpose. This lesson has taught my students teamwork, intrinsic discipline, and how to fully integrate math, technology, visual, and audio arts into one art form.

Name: Josette Twait
School/Organization:
McLaughlin Middle School and Fine Arts Academy
Position:
Graphic Arts Teacher
County:
Polk
Email:
josette.twait@polk-fl.net
Phone: 
863-438-7100


TREASURE MAPS TO THE FCAT WRITES

Purpose:

Treasure Maps to the FCAT is an art project that integrates literature, expository writing and the Arts. Students gain ideas from stories like Treasure Island and relate them to modern uses of treasure maps in literature, movies, and even video games. They then use their imaginations to create a unique art project that requires them to use expository writing, colorful and descriptive language, drawing, composition, map skills, and, most of all, their imaginations.

Who is Involved?

This project can be done in the art classroom only or in collaboration with language arts and social studies teachers.

Why is this program important?

It incorporates many skills and all different types of learners become intensely involved and are greatly successful on all levels.

Name: Terese Whittaker
School/Organization: St. Cloud Elementary School
Position: Art Teacher
County: Osceola
Email: whittakert@osceola.k12.fl.us
Phone: 407-891-3160

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Section 4:  Arts Curriculum

Practices

Buddah: Changes Throughout Time: Debra Beverlin

 Art and Science: Nicole Crane

Programs

Watercolor Process/Microbiology/Creative Writing: William Buchanan

String in the Elementary School: Jimmy Gills

Art is Everything is Art: Carol Hughes

FCAT + MUSIC CAN = FUN: Stephanie McNaughton

Sculpture in a Book: Terri Noell

Field Trip Friends: Gwenn Seuling

Speaking in T.U.N.E.: Judith Steinmeyer

Divergent Learning Through Visual Journaling: Phi YoBa

Arts Integration: Britt Feingold


Section 4:  Arts Curriculum

     Best Practices

BUDDHA: CHANGES THROUGHOUT TIME

Purpose:

The purpose of Buddha: Changes throughout Time is to teach art history through hands on experience using authentic art vocabulary and the Feldman model for critique writing. Students create their own Buddha after examining Indian origins and Eastern trends over a period of time. We either put a modern twist on the details or remain true to the cultures of the Silk Road.  Click here to link to this Lesson Plan.

Who is Involved?

Olympia High School encourages all teachers to engaassets/OnlineRes/Compendium2012/the_many_faces_of_buddha_lesson.docge students in active learning. As a Visual Arts teacher, I support Olympia's goal by enhancing visual arts experiences with other core subjects.  Arts Integration in my classroom looks different from most classrooms; ratio and proportion with measurement, contextual reading, strategic writing, world history, biology and botany all are part of drawing and painting.

Why is this program important?

The study of cultural and ancient icons allows students who lack confidence in their art skills to succeed with both the historical and artistic content.  The arts integrated lesson incorporates World History, English/Writing, and Visual Arts/Ceramics. Critical analysis and writing are incorporated to provide a comprehensive learning experience.

Name: Debra Beverlin
School/Organization: Olympia High School/Orange County Public Schools
Position: AP Studio & Art History teacher
County: Orange
Email: Debra.beverlin@ocps.net
Phone: 407-493-5643

ART AND SCIENCE: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH

Purpose:

This program features a cross-curricular thematic unit of various science based art lessons. The lessons relate to science concepts including amphibians and reptiles, the ocean, insects and arachnids, the solar system, and flowers, plants, and leaves. Lessons can be combined as a unit or used independently and include a variety of techniques, mediums and artists.  See a Powerpoint here .

Who is involved? The art teacher continually conducts lessons in a year-long thematic curriculum aligned with the school's mission.

Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

1000

Why is the program important?

The lessons align art projects with science topics that are covered school wide. The students have a higher level of understanding and comprehension as a result of the transfer of knowledge.  For a chart of projects and suggested grade levels, click here .

How is the program funded?

The program is funded through the school’s annual art budget.

Name: Nicole Crane
School/Organization: Elbridge Gale Elementary
Position: Art Teacher
County: Palm Beach
Email: nicole.crane@palmbeachschools.org
Phone: 561-876-5607


Section 4. Arts Curriculum

Programs

WATERCOLOR PROCESSES/MICRO BIOLOGY/CREATIVE WRITING

Purpose:

The purpose of this program is to introduce students to micro-photography, watercolor theory and processes, and creative writing by blending these three facets into a unified and engaging curriculum. Students learn a number of hands-on techniques, including the science and fine art process of color mixing, integrated with an introduction to scientific micro-photography, with the primary source for materials coming from the Annual International Nikon Micro-Photo Contest winners.  Activities are pulled together with creative writing and illustration processes.

Why is this program important?

Students are introduced to Visual Arts/Science Learning watercolor processes while studying micro-organisms and extreme micro photography. Co-joined with creative writing techniques, storytelling, dialogue, and fiction-fantasy, students engage in learning across several content areas through artistic expression.

Name: William Buchanan
School/Organization: Bak Middle School of the Arts
Position: Visual Arts Instructor 6-8grade
County: Palm Beach
Email: bill.buchanan@palmbeachschools.org
Phone: 561.882.3879

STRINGS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Purpose:

The purpose of Strings in the Elementary School is to involve early childhood classrooms in fostering the research proven connections of music to brain development.  Students as young as first grade are enmeshed in instructor-led instrumental instruction.

Who is Involved?

Our AI program is fully infused into the curriculum with an emphasis on collaboration among teachers and administration. The Arts department includes a dance/drama teacher, two visual arts teachers, two music teachers, and a strings teacher.

Why is this program important?

Ours is one of the only a few public schools that fully embrace the idea of instrumental training beginning at the 1st grade level. Although violin training is not a new idea, it is a new idea for schools to put money into training students beginning at an early age. While other schools are rushing to drop arts programs because they do not value them as much as reading, math, or other programs that relate to standardized testing, our school is leading students in this direction because we believe the research suggesting that students who receive instrumental training score better on standardized tests, are more likely to graduate high school and to attend and finish college. Many instrumental programs are started because the student body shows the interest and the school follows behind. At our school we are leading the students down this path as opposed to the students leading us.

Name: Jimmy Gillis
School/Organization: Apalachee Tapestry Magnet School of the Arts
Position: Strings teacher
County: Leon
Email: gillisj@leonschools.net
Phone: 8505670839

ART IS EVERYTHING IS ART

Purpose:

The purpose of Art is Everything is Art is to reinforce higher level thinking in all students and make them feel successful both publicly and privately by presenting varied core subject content and skills through the arts.  Visual art classes teach core subjects while providing a high quality visual art curriculum.  For example, through use of a time line, main idea, sequencing, and vocabulary are taught in a way that is unusual and intriguing.  Presented in this context, content is “owned” by the students. 

Who is involved?

Dr. Anna Gonzalez is our spirited, passionate principal.  She understands integration is necessary to educate a diverse population and the whole child, and, therefore, incorporates the arts in teacher trainings and throughout the school. The art teacher, who also teaches grade level reading, takes a leadership role in arts integration at the school.

Frequency:

Ongoing       

Number of Students:

460

Why is the program important?

Hillcrest is a magnet school, open to all students in Orange County as well as to “zoned” students, including two homeless shelters.  At Hillcrest, each student has a daily full language block in either Spanish, French, or Vietnamese.  While some students struggle with the language block, art is a wonderful way to bridge the gap. Through visual art, students’ understanding of content in other disciplines is reviewed and reinforced.  Art is an international language and an expressive time for all the students.

How is the program funded?

Each year we have offered Square 1 Art as a fund raiser.

Name: Carol Hughes
School/Organization: Hillcrest Elementary
Position: Teacher 4/5
County: Orange
Email: carol.hughes2@ocps.net
Phone: 407-245-1770x2269

FCAT + MUSIC CAN = FUN

Purpose:

This program integrates reading and math into chorus rehearsals. Based on 4th and 5th grade teacher feedback regarding students’ areas of need as well as benchmarks from the FCAT, music integrated strategies have been developed.

Working on reading, vocabulary, reading application (such as author's purpose, descriptive language, main idea, conclusions) and multiplication while still concentrating on quality singing and musicianship provides addition repetition and practice for students maximizes learning time for students.  Some examples include: times table scales, dissecting the lyrics to understand the message, using a vocabulary review game to assist with the Pinellas County vocabulary project, and music math.

Why is this program important?

Integrating reading and FCAT benchmarks provides extra help on FCAT topics while at the same time improving my rehearsals and turning out “smart” musicians.  I created a multiplication warm up which the kids enjoy singing every week. It’s a great way for kids to have fun with multiplication facts!

Name: Stephanie McNaughton
School/Organization:
Westgate Elementary
Position:
music teacher
County:
Pinellas
Email:
mcnaughtons@pcsb.org
Phone:
727-421-1242

SCULPTURE IN A BOOK

Purpose:
This program provides a new and creative use for recycling all those old library books that are discarded every year! Students learn paper folding and some cutting techniques to produce a 3 dimensional sculpture.        

Why is this program important?

Originally, these lessons were developed for physically and mentally challenged students.  The main objective for these students was to develop control of only two fingers and their elbows. They love and are successful with book sculptures; students feel fulfilled by their creations of beautiful works of art! The best thing is that ANYONE can be successful with these projects; one is only limited by imagination and the supply of books.

Name: Terri Noell
School/Organization: West Pensacola Elementary
Position: Art Educator
County: Escambia
Email: tnoell@escambia,k12.fl.us
Phone: 850-454-6508

FIELD TRIP FRIENDS

Purpose:

The purpose of Field Trip Friends is to encourage interdisciplinary field trips that will demonstrate to students the connection between all subjects

Who is Involved?

These field trips have been cooperative efforts between Visual Arts and Language Arts teachers and their students.  Each teacher invites students from 9th through 12th grade to participate in the pre- and post-activities as well as the field trip.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

100 students

Why is this program important?

Students need to see that the connections between disciplines are not exclusive of each other, but intertwined. Art students write about their work while writing students create art and all are inspired by each other.

How is the program funded?

Grant funding supports this program.

Name: Gwenn Seuling
School/Organization: Seminole Ridge Charter High School
Position: Art Instructor
County: Palm Beach
Email: gwenn.seuling@palmbeachschools.org
Phone: 561-703-3298

SPEAKING IN T.U.N.E.

Purpose:

What is T.U.N.E.?

        T:  talk

        U:  understand

        N:  negotiate

        E:  express

Through the TUNE strategy, students use music, writing, and verbal communication become “in tune” with the inter-connectedness of these three elements as a vehicle for conflict resolution.  Speaking in T.U.N.E. is an academic arts integrated program designed to meet the specific needs and goals of a classroom or school. It provides students with hands-on planning, creating, and practicing conflict resolution.

Click here to see a residency plan.

Who is involved?

Students, resource teachers, classroom teachers, administrators, and community members are all involved.  In a collaborative process, a teaching artist/facilitator and classroom/subject area teacher identify specific areas of conflict or potential conflict to address through the program.

Program Frequency:

One time with ongoing reinforcement.   

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

120

Why is the program important?

Speaking in T.U.N.E. provides students (and others) with a successful, arts-integrated strategy to use for conflict resolution. It is a preventive program, not a "fix-it" solution. Through practice with utilizing the strategy, students walk away knowing that they have a plan when future conflicts arise.

How is the program funded?

Funding is provided through the PTO/PTA, community arts organizations, the Chamber of Commerce, faith-based organizations, and private donors.

Name: Judith Steinmeyer
School/Organization: FAAE artist member
Position: Music teacher, PK-8
County: Duval
Email: judyviolin@bellsouth.net
Phone: 904-294-8683

DIVERGENT LEARNING THROUGH VISUAL JOURNALING

Purpose:

Why must students investigate ideas in prescriptive steps? This Program allows students to engage in holistic exploration through visual journaling prompts that allow fluid artistic expressions of discovery and notation. This process could lead to an explosion of creative awareness and innovation needed for 21st century success.

Please click here for a link to further information.

Why is this program important?

Through visual journaling, students gain access to other dimensions of personal research and learning; they are not plagued by visual expectations. Students can research topics from any subject area and visually journal to document it pictorially using mark making techniques and inventive, authentic concept drawings. These journal books give students the opportunity to take artistic risk while exploring other topics of interest and websites using technology.

Name: Phi YoBa
School/Organization: Seminole High School
Position: Art director/ Art Bus Tech Department Chair
County: Seminole
Email: phi_yoba@scps.k12.fl.us
Phone: 407-760-6038


BUDDHA: CHANGES THROUGHOUT TIME

 

Purpose:

The purpose of Buddha: Changes throughout Time is to teach art history through hands on experience using authentic art vocabulary and the Feldman model for critique writing. Students create their own Buddha after examining Indian origins and Eastern trends over a period of time. We either put a modern twist on the details or remain true to the cultures of the Silk Road.

 

Who is Involved?

Olympia High School encourages all teachers to engage students in active learning. As a Visual Arts teacher, I support Olympia's goal by enhancing visual arts experiences with other core subjects.  Arts Integration in my classroom looks different from most classrooms; ratio and proportion with measurement, contextual reading, strategic writing, world history, biology and botany all are part of drawing and painting.

Why is this program important?

The study of cultural and ancient icons allows students who lack confidence in their art skills to succeed with both the historical and artistic content.  The arts integrated lesson incorporates World History, English/Writing, and Visual Arts/Ceramics. Critical analysis and writing are incorporated to provide a comprehensive learning experience.

Name: Debra Beverlin
School/Organization: Olympia High School/Orange County Public Schools
Position: AP Studio & Art History teacher
County: Orange
Email: Debra.beverlin@ocps.net
Phone: 407-493-5643


ARTS INTEGRATION

 

What is the purpose of your program?

This program, taught by the school's art, music, media, and physical education teachers, incorporates the  arts into each curricular content area.  When possible, children's literature is included in the presentation of content.  When learning through the arts, students retain more information and are more interested in learning. Please click here to view a PowerPoint about this program.   

Who is involved?

The fine arts team works with the International Baccaulaurete program coordinator to develop lessons and materials that link directly to general curriculum.  All students in the school participate in these classes.

Program Frequency: Ongoing     


Number of Students: 500

 

Why is the program important?

This program helps keep the arts alive in children.  This program allows the students to express themselves artistically in all subject areas.  The school serves students from low socio-economic backgrounds.  Many students are engaged in the arts only in school.


How is the program funded?

The program was originated with grant funding.  Because of its success, school budget monies have been allocated to provide continuing support.  In addition, teachers write individual grants to support the purchase of materials.

 

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Section 5:

          Higher Education

Best Practices

Building Learning Communities Through Arts and Culture: Kathleen Klein

PAInT Center: Elizabeth Larkin

Programs

Heart and Soul: Meaningful Integration of Visual Art and Literacy: Susannah Brown


Section 5:

          Higher Education

Best Practices 

BUILDING LEARNING COMMUNITIES THROUGH ARTS AND CULTURE

Purpose:

The goal of our program is to expand and advance outcome-driven arts and cultural programs for middle school children and their teachers in Palm Beach County.  This program focuses on social studies curriculum.  See our Powerpoint here

Who is involved?

The teaching artists and the participating middle school selects a curriculum focus and participates in ten integrated lessons over the course of a semester.  The partnership includes the teaching team, the school principal, an outside evaluator, and other interested parties.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

200-250

Why is the program important?

Effective middle school and university partnerships engage leaders, teachers, and external cultural providers in ongoing curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation resulting in meaningful, documented learning for students.

How is the program funded?

The program is funded by the Palm Beach County Cultural Council with a matching grant of cash and in-kind support from the university.

Name: Kathleen Klein
School/Organization: Palm Beach Atlantic University
Position: Chair, Dance Dept.
County: Palm Beach
Email: kathleen_klein@pba.edu
Phone: 561-310-4004

PAInT CENTER

Purpose:

The PAInT Center of the University of South Florida – Sarasota-Manatee College of Education coordinates teaching, research, and documentation efforts among University faculty, local artists, arts organizations, and our neighboring school districts. The purpose is to infuse arts integration in programs in order to increase learning outcomes and disseminate evidence of effective teaching methods for learners of all ages.

Who is involved?

Each USFSM College of Education faculty member is partnered with a specific artist or arts organization to develop curriculum and activities for school classrooms. Under the guidance of faculty, University students in all USFSM degree programs (including, for example, elementary education, reading, and educational leadership) participate in arts events and plan arts integrated curriculum projects to increase their expertise in using imaginative and critical literacies to improve student learning outcomes.

Program Frequency:

Ongoing       

Approximately how many Florida students are reached annually through this program?

350

Why is the program important?

This collaboration among University faculty and students, local arts organizations, and neighboring school districts benefits all the participants. USFSM students gain effective education tools to teach all children well. The schools benefit by bringing in the University's resources and expertise through internships and shared events to increase student learning outcomes.  The community benefits by tapping its uniquely rich artistic talent to promote both our national and regional cultural heritage.

How is the program funded?

The PAInT Center is supported by USFSM's College of Education and is in the process of seeking permanent endowment to fund programs. We currently have limited funding for artists-in-residence (arts fellows) and scholarships for artists pursuing a teaching degree.  The Sarasota school district has funding for their Any Given Child initiative through the Kennedy Center.

Name: Elizabeth Larkin
School/Organization: USF Sarasota-Manatee
Position: Professor, Director of PAInT
County: Sarasota
Email: llarkin@sar.usf.edu
Phone:
941-359-4364

Section 5: Higher Education

Programs 

HEART AND SOUL: MEANINGFUL INTEGRATION OF VISUAL ART AND LITERACY

Purpose:

Focus on the HeART of visual arts in your classroom as integrated with literacy activities. Participate in activities that enhance self-expression and creativity in studio production and writing. Through our museum education program at the Florida Atlantic University Galleries, FAU students design and create exhibitions, field trips for middle and high school students, workshops for educators, and events for the community.

Who is involved?

In collaboration with the College of Education and the College of Arts and Letters, FAU students attend a series of workshops that focus on arts integration through museum and visual arts education. We host symposia for educators in collaboration with the Kennedy Center for the Arts both on and off-campus. We connect with the local community through school site visits integrating visual arts with the curriculum, and we work with the Boys and Girls Clubs of Deerfield Beach on various projects and exhibitions both at their site and on the FAU campus. FAU students learn valuable skills that promote a broad understanding of visual arts in our lives through education and community service.

Why is this program important?

The FAU museum education program is unique because FAU undergraduate and graduate students have an opportunity to apply their visual arts knowledge and training in real-world settings that promote art education in our schools and community. As the majority of students involved in the program are not education majors, rather they are studio and art history majors, this program provides a unique opportunity for FAU students to consider how education and integration of the arts can be a part of their future professional careers. In many ways, this program grooms future teaching-artists and museum educators by providing realistic experiences in galleries and educational settings. Working with the Kennedy Center for the Arts has been a wonderful opportunity for our FAU students to understand how a large professional arts organization functions and provides valuable educational services and workshops for teachers.

Name: Susannah Brown
School/Organization: Florida Atlantic University
Position: Associate Professor of Art Education
County: Palm Beach
Email: sbrow118@fau.edu
Phone: 561 297-2635

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